Why not improve your local school instead of sending your children to private school?

In an article over at LearnVest a parent graciously describes the details  and sacrifices of why they send their children to private school  to help educate us and share their story.

The comments in response to the article were filled with criticisms.

One comment stood out;

“I love the “we had no choice” but to put our kid in private [school] argument.  Why not put your kid in the public school and spend some energy improving the school? “

I honor and respect those who sacrifice by staying in a difficult environment to make things better.  They reject better choices for their family for the good of the community.

So lets extend this persons line of thinking to explore the principal behind it. Couldn’t the family take public transportation every where and become vocal advocates? Or move to a food desert and use their earning power and ability to problem solve to help the entire community have access to fruit and vegetables?

What I don’t understand is the willingness to put someone else (in this case, their children) in an environment that needs improvement on multiple levels that are unlikely to be solved in the time they are there.

Another alternative is to send your child to a private school that teaches social activism and key life skills. Thinking longer term, an adult who  will spend a life time thinking about how to help others and will have the tools and financial means to do is another valid way to help both the family and the broader community.

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2 thoughts on “Why not improve your local school instead of sending your children to private school?”

  1. I side with you. I don’t believe our children should be “used” to try to improve a system that in general changes for the worse, not the better.

    Your family can be a light to try to make improves in a community without putting your children smack-dab in the middle of the problem.

    Our children go to a small, charter public high school, they went through private school through 8th grade. And even in this smaller, more controlled environment, the stories we hear, leave us speechless. I can’t imagine what a bigger school would be like.

    1. Thanks for the comment and for sharing your perspective. Totally agree – I am often surprised on what we hear as well. Somewhat related – a family we know recently switched from a public school that just wasn’t a match to a private school that had a different focus and it already appears to be good match. Any time a child gets matched with a structure that is a fit – via a public school, a charter school or a private school – that makes me happy and what we want for every child.

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